Positive Pay History

There are three ways to lose points in positive pay history.

When you get a mortgage or car loan initially you lose points.This is because the total amount of credit given is equal to the debt that is owed. As you pay down both of the previously mentioned accounts you gain points. Far better to purchase well within your means so you can pay more to principle. This will do two things: you get more points quicker and you save a ton of money on interest.

Revolving types of accounts are different. You initially gain 50 points for getting the credit account. When you balance exceeds 30% of the total limit you lose 25 points. You gain those points back by paying down your balance and keeping it below 30%.

 

The last way you gain points in positive pay history is by having a wide margin between the credit extended and the debt that's owed. For example the creditor gives you a $1000 limit and you use only $100 and keep your balance at or below $100 consistently.

 

You need positive credit because it brings you closer to having an ideal credit profile, not because you want new furniture. Once you open an account the rule is to keep it opened and keep it positive. You can gain as much as 176 points by never closing accounts. This means you will only get what you can afford to pay back and keep forever.

Personal Information

Your name, addresses,employment, phone numbers and spouse is listed in this section. This information will help you to look stronger on paper if you manage it correctly.

 

The only name the credit bureaus recognize is the name on a current photo ID such as a drivers license or passport. Any name variation used  results in aliases or sets you up for a greater fraud risk. Your name on your drivers license or passport  must match the name in your credit report exactly or it is reported as an alias.

 

You look stronger if you only have one or two addresses in your report. If you are going to move around, it is best to get a post office box in that area and use that address. Having multiple addresses makes you look transient and unstable.

 

You look stronger if you remain in the same field or industry. Changing jobs frequently suggests you have a problem maintaining income levels and puts you at a greater risk.